FuturePump, SunCulture And 11 Other Clean Energy Innovators To Receive $13 Million In Funding

About Powering Agriculture

Powering Agriculture: An Energy Grand Challenge for Development supports the development and deployment of clean energy innovations that increase agriculture productivity and stimulate low carbon economic growth in the agriculture sector of developing countries to help end extreme poverty and extreme hunger.

On November 20, 2015, thirteen innovators will be receiving almost $13 million in funding and will join the Powering Agriculture: An Energy Grand Challenge for Development (PAEGC) initiative

These innovators, seven of which are Africa-focused, will be unveiling their clean energy innovations, which range from microgrid technologies to irrigation and cold storage solutions, at the 2015 Powering Agriculture Innovator Showcase in Washington D.C.

The innovator showcase which is hosted by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) will bring together investors, accelerators, donors, and technical experts working in the energy/agriculture nexus to discuss how they are addressing global climate change and meeting the need for clean energy in agriculture to feed the developing world.

The Founder and CEO of Hello Tractor, Mr. Jehiel Oliver, will be the keynote speaker.

The innovators with Africa focused projects include Ariya Capital, Futurepump, Husk Power Systems, KickStart International, SimGas Tanzania, SunCulture, Village Infrastructure Angels and Horn of Africa Regional Environment Center and Network. Their full profiles and proposed projects are at the link.

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