Kenyan Farmers Use SunCulture Solar Power to Help Water Dry Land

Published: Jul. 26, 2016

By Anjli Raval for Financial Times

About Powering Agriculture

Powering Agriculture: An Energy Grand Challenge for Development supports the development and deployment of clean energy innovations that increase agriculture productivity and stimulate low carbon economic growth in the agriculture sector of developing countries to help end extreme poverty and extreme hunger.

SunCulture seeks to transform subsistence farming in arid areas of Kenya.

Limited rainfall has encouraged local farmers to limit their crop choices, and to use inefficient, expensive and environmentally detrimental irrigation methods. SunCulture looks to make better choices available to such farmers by offering irrigation systems that use solar-powered electric motors to pull water from the ground to raised tanks, where gravity then feeds it into irrigation pipes. They're economical, accessible and can boost crop yields by 300%.

"My workers can now focus on the quality, by weeding, taking care of the produce, harvesting, rather than focusing on menial tasks such as watering," – Alice Migwi, Kenyan Farmer

Read the full article at the Financial Times (subscription required).

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